If “sexy alayna” sent you a message, would you accept it? [Image]

only_if_my_wife_isnt_around

So. Would you hit ‘Yes’ or ‘No’? Fair warning; that is likely a spambot and/or will send you links to malware. But at least it has sexy in the name, right?

Or I suppose a better question is: who the hell still uses AIM?

[via Reddit]

Share this post

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

3 comments

  1. Machar

    My personal favourites are those apparently from the FBI, the messages misspelt (OK, that’s maybe believable), purporting to lead somehow to monies that are apparently mine – and always of ridiculously huge amounts. I’m pretty sure I’d be aware of millions of dollars (never pounds, euros, shekels or any other currency) that even vaguely might belong to me, however circuitous the circumstances.

    Presumably some numpties do respond to these preposterous emails, but who are they? And do /they/ still use AIM?

    Following that line of logic, if we eliminate AOL would that in turn do away with a chunk of these silly phisherpholk(tm), however ‘sexy’ they present themselves as?

  2. Seamus McSeamus

    Sure! It would have to be legit, just like all those emails promising girls in my area who are looking to hook up, money from an African prince, and great deals on mail order drugs.