Kim Dotcom is creating a “highly-secure email service” that will store user data outside the USA

kimdotcom

When Lavabit, the email service used by Edward Snowden, shut itself down, many people were worried that it was the end of secure privacy-focused email. Kim Dotcom has decided to capitalize on that by putting up a “highly-secure email service to run on a non-US-based server.”

“The biggest tech hurdle is providing email functionality that people expect, such as searching emails, that are trivial to provide if emails are stored in plain text (or available in plain text) on the server side. If all the server can see is encrypted text, as is the case with true end-to-end encryption, then all the functionality has to be built client side… On this and other fronts, Mega is doing some hugely cutting-edge stuff. There is probably no one in the world who takes the Mega approach of making true crypto work for the masses, our core proposition.”

According to Dotcom, his company Mega never holds any decryption keys. Which means that your emails would be unreadable by them, even if the government requested them to do so.

With Mega still up and running and looking healthier than ever with more than 4 million users, a secure email service from the guys behind it might not seem like such a bad idea.

[via Gizmodo, image via Peter Harrison]

Share this post

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

11 comments

  1. Tom

    I hope that Kim will be scrupulously monitoring Mega servers for signs of external compromise, a la Stuxnet. The NSA will stop at nothing to gain access to his servers.

    BTW, I’ve heard that AES has been broken… any details?

  2. CJ Cotter

    I’m not bothered by the possibility of government people looking through my email, because I have nothing to hide. I get mostly newsletters and ads from companies that I do business with.

    What really gripes me are the email providers who go through my email looking for information they can freely give out to advertisers at a profit, without my permission. I don’t mind paying for an email service if they keep the leeches and parasites away.

  3. JMJ

    [@Ed] Even before learning what the NSA has been doing, of course, I was concerned about who had access to what info concerning me and mine. My point here is that I trust NO ONE when it comes to my and my Folks’ safety, including privacy. When I send an email that is personal, private or confidential, I ALWAYS sign & encrypt it. Mega will not make me change that.

    With that in mind, do you see my point? What’s the big deal about email security if you do what I do and encrypt via a certificate?

    Long ago, I began treating something as secret only if I alone knew it. No exceptions.

    I was number two on the College of Cardinals’ short list for Pope…. So all my letters to girlfriends are G-spot rated. ;-)

  4. Ed

    [@JMJ]

    The big deal is all about privacy, these days just about every email keystroke you make and send goes through the NSA or Prism for data collection. Do you really want some troll sitting behind a desk at the NSA trolling your emails and reading that *ahem* dirty email you sent your girlfriend?
    Secure email is the way to go, it’s a hell of a lot better than encrypting your email and sending it via Gmail or your ISP and having to hand out a bunch of encryption keys to everyone you know so they can open and read your email, these days all the secure email providers in the continental U.S. have been dropping like flies, I have been searching high and low for a secure provider outside the U.S. and Kim Dot Com has just come through for me!

  5. JMJ

    I hope he succeeds in a huge way with this and with Mega. What the U.S. Gov’t. did to him is criminal, I think; and I don’t mean that in an I-am-outraged way. In addition to malfeasance as Officers-of-the-Court, I believe the prosecutors broke the law.

    Anyway, a no0b question: What’s the big deal about email security when you can just install a Comodo Secure Email Certificate, for example, and encrypt to your heart’s content?