2D version of Nintendo 3DS announced, is cheaper but still plays all 3DS and DS games

nintendo 2ds

There’s a new member to the Nintendo 3DS family of handheld game consoles, and it’s called the Nintendo 2DS. The 2DS allows for playing 3DS and DS games, however, gamers won’t have the option to play in 3D. The fact that Nintendo released a version of the 3DS without the 3D functionality is testament enough on how consumers are reacting to the feature.

The new device looks pretty decent, though its design is quite different from its predecessor. What we have here is a slate like design rather than the clam-shell design of the Nintendo 3DS. We would have preferred if Nintendo chose to stick with the clamshell design, which we believe serves as a really solid screen protector when the device is not in use.

“We’re always thinking about what we can do that’s new, unique, different, and brings more people into this category that we love,” says Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime to IGN. “And so with the Nintendo 3DS, we were clear to parents that, ‘hey, we recommend that your children be seven and older to utilize this device.’ So clearly that creates an opportunity for five-year-olds, six-year-olds, that first-time handheld gaming consumer.”

Nintendo promises to have the 2DS go on sale for a cool $129.99 on October 12, that’s the same day the new Pokemon X and Y games go on sale. (Nintendo 3DS goes for $169.99.) Children and adults alike, who are fans of Pokemon, will be able to pick up the affordable 2DS console to play their favorite video game series. It’s a clever move by Nintendo, one that should see adoption of the 2DS kick off to a great start before the holidays.

[via IGN, image via Nintendo]

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  1. The Living Spirit

    It’s quite amazing how much of the mainstream media is missing the point of the device; which is even made semi-obvious by Nintendo’s statement: “And so with the Nintendo 3DS, we were clear to parents that, ‘hey, we recommend that your children be seven and older to utilize this device.’ So clearly that creates an opportunity for five-year-olds, six-year-olds, that first-time handheld gaming consumer.”

    Nintendo don’t recommend the 3DS to under sevens because of health concerns related to the 3DS – many adverts in fact specifically say “3D Effect not suitable for under 7s”. Apparently, younger eyes are not yet well adapted enough to understand stereoscopic 3D and prolonged exposure to it could be damaging to their sight or cause headaches. The stereoscopic 3D effect also affects older minds however, which need to concentrate more on two sets of images at once; and it is estimated that one in ten people will get headaches from just a short period of usage with 3D enabled.

    The 3D effect is also unsuitable for those with an inability to focus their sight completely straight; for example, those who are cross-eyed. While one COULD just keep the 3D effect disabled, this is basically defeating the object of the 3DS console. Releasing a 2D version of the 3DS allows Nintendo to directly target customers that would not be able to take full enjoyment of the 3DS console previously – not just the 5 and 6-year olds they themselves identified, but also those with visual impairments that prevent stereoscopic 3D from working for them – thus immediately enlarging their potential market.