- dotTech - http://dottech.org -

Can you help a plant grow by tweeting at it? Denver Museum of Nature and Science aims to find out

Posted By Vamien McKalin On October 19, 2013 @ 3:57 AM In General Tech,World Wide Web | 1 Comment

talk to a plant [1]

What if you could speak to a plant to help it grow? We’ve heard that before, though there is no real proof behind it. This is the reason why the Denver Museum of Nature and Science has planned to put this idea to the test, but with a twist.

The museum plans an interactive experiment as part of “MythBusters: The Explosive Exhibition.” This means that anyone would be able to tweet at a plant situated at the museum via the project’s official website. All tweets will be converted to robotic speed, which would then be transferred to the plant via a speaker and the results studied.

If you take a visit to the official site, you will have the option to listen to tweets as they come in.

To better evaluate the results, the team has another plant at the museum that is in total silence. The team will evaluate both plants to see which plant has increased the most over the experiment period.

We visited the website to understand what is really going on with this experiment. In the end, we came away quite shocked. You see; the plant that is being spoken to by folks on Twitter has grown larger than the one in silence. In addition, its leaves are bigger and its color is also greener when compared to the other plant.

Now, while it could very well mean that talking to plants really does make a difference, we’re not quite convinced. We might just have to do our own little test to confirm that the findings from this little experiment is indeed real.

[via Talk To a Plant [2]]


Article printed from dotTech: http://dottech.org

URL to article: http://dottech.org/131895/can-help-plant-grow-tweeting-denver-museum-nature-science-aims-find/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: https://dottech.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/talk-to-a-plant.png

[2] Talk To a Plant: http://www.talktoaplant.com/#

© 2008-2012 dotTech.org | All content is the property of its rightful owner.