Free 1 year license of Zemana AntiLogger!

The worst of scumware, undoubtedly, are loggers. Whether it is a keylogger, or a different type of logger, these scumware have the potential to turn your world upside down by transmitting private information – such as credit card numbers, bank account information, social security number, etc. – to malicious people who will, without a second thought, use your information to their advantage. To help fight some of this, I have discussed KeyScrambler before, a software that is effectively an anti-keylogger. Zemana AntiLogger is a security software which takes that anti-keylogger aspect of KeyScrambler and expands on it by adding in various different anti-logging features to protect users from not only keyloggers, but many other different type of “logging “scumware.

Here is a detailed list of what Zemana AntiLogger can do, as per the developer:

While I can’t personally vouch for Zemana AntiLogger’s performance (because I have not used it long enough to say how good or bad it is), on paper Zemana AntiLogger looks very impressive. Furthermore, another noteworthy aspect of Zemana AntiLogger is its ability to work side-by-side with other security software. The developer has compiled a list of security software Zemana AntiLogger is “compatible” with:

As you can see, according to the developer, Zemana AntiLogger works with most popular security software.

Usually Zemana AntiLogger would cost $34 (USD) per year. However, for a limited time – until January 31, 2010 12:00 PM EST – users can get 1 year of Zemana AntiLogger for free!

To get Zemana AntiLogger for free, follow these simple directions:

Version being given out for free: 1.9.2.164

Free updates: Yes – free updates for 1 year

Supported OS: Windows XP SP2+/Vista/Win7

Note: 64-bit not supported

Download size: 6.7 MB

  • At the promotion page, you will be given your license key:

Copy the license key.

  • Download and install Zemana AntiLogger.
  • After installation, you will need to restart your computer, so restart it.
  • After your computer has been restarted, run Zemana AntiLogger (if it doesn’t start automatically on reboot), and register it with the license key you received earlier:

  • Enjoy!

If you have any trouble getting Zemana AntiLogger, or any trouble with it in general, feel free to post below or contact Zemana support directly.

Thanks Ozzie!

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41 comments

  1. Jimmy

    The worst scumware undoubtedly IS Zemana AntiLogger! Dam nefarious company pulls every trick in the book to install this piece of crap keylogger behind your back! Beware and block the jscript on pages that try to load this wretched software. Shame on you Zemana!

  2. t.g.

    Just downloaded Zemana. BIG MISTAKE !! The second Zemana moved to the system tray, a message came up to tell me my pc was protected, then my pc froze, With the little sign. Had to unplug and system restore. Any one had same experience or know why this happened ? Thanks.

  3. Ramesh Kumar

    Jumbi – Difficult to say one way or the other since it is not open source code.

    I read that comment too. The only thing one can conclude is that the later file will now onwards supersede the earlier one because the latest exe prevails.Having said that one need not automatically conclude negatively because:-
    1) The fact that bots tried to prevent downloads of Zemana means they were scared of Zemana
    2) The fact that they were scared means they fear that Zemana is a good app which has the potential to stop bots in their track

    Ramesh Kumar

  4. Corno

    I used this program as beta tester some year ago, and it seems to have been improved quite a bit. Way less false positives. As for the security aspect: simple, if you don’t trust it, don’t use it.

  5. Steve

    @Phoenix:
    [quote]The WGA shouldn’t be connected to Zemana AntiLogger, and nowadays I believe it’s needed for windows updates to function properly.[quote]

    I don’t believe it is “connected”, and agree that WGA is needed for updates, but I only ever seen it ask for authentication when I’m on the Windows update site. I never realized it also sent one on start-up.
    ~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~
    [quote]Aside from Zemana’s updates (which I can’t tell if they’re only manual or not),[/quote]

    Open Zemana settings >General Settings tab >Check, Automatically check for updates and notify me (second from bottom) >click save

  6. Phoenix

    @Steve:

    The WGA shouldn’t be connected to Zemana AntiLogger, and nowadays I believe it’s needed for windows updates to function properly.

    Aside from Zemana’s updates (which I can’t tell if they’re only manual or not), I noticed in the settings that they have a whitelist (which I assumed was local and part of the 4 or 6.7 Mb) and an option to use the internet to check digital Authenticode signature information. I would assume the last one is the part that’s making it want access to the net or phone home.

    I’ve had more of a chance to use it and it doesn’t seem to be phoning home at every startup so it might just have been getting used to my programs in the short time I had to test it prior to my previous comment.

  7. Steve

    @jumbi:
    I have 1.9.2.164 and its 3.95MB

    @Phoenix:

    I’ve noticed this activity at start-up.
    Not sure if I can stop this or not, or even if I should.

    I wonder why my PC has to “check in” at start-up?

    Permission = 1
    Action = Allowed
    Description = Windows Genuine Advantage Notifications
    Process Name = WgaTray.exe
    Process Path = C:\WINDOWS\system32\WgaTray.exe
    Component =
    Company = (Verified) Microsoft Corporation
    Activity = Physical Memory Access (Type: 22)
    MD5 Hash = B1296D52B0D2096EC4759EEEB806D759
    Date = 30/1/2010 – 7:06:18 PM

  8. blue

    @MuviCut: Worked for me and the site says can be installed through 2/1/2010.

    I had no problems. And this thing rocks! Am also using Online Armor++ (another terrific freebie, btw) but it made me a little nervous when it identified a program that I use all the time as a keylogger. Since I wasn’t completely sure about the origin of this, I was about ready to uninstall it. I then found Zemana, which found no keylogger in it. Sweet!

  9. Phoenix

    @MuviCut:

    They had a DOS attack and the links weren’t working for a while.

    http://billmullins.wordpress.com/2010/01/31/zemana-antilogger-server-attacked-by-bots/

    As a result of this the offer has been extended for another day (Until Feb 1st midnight, Eastern Standard Time).

    http://billmullins.wordpress.com/2010/02/01/free-licenses-for-zemana-antilogger-continues-one-more-day/

    I don’t know if the link in the original post stil works but the one in the second link I put here was working when I checked it around 4:20 PM EST.

    I’ve had it on my system for a little over a day and it seems to work well, warning me of various attempts by different programs to capture keystrokes, capture screen, etc., and allowing me to allow or deny them all the time or just this time.

    I have Avira and Avast running on my system, as well as Zone Alarm, SpyBot Search and Destroy with Tea Timer, WinPatrol and a couple of on demand security products. I haven’t noticed any suspicious behaviour by the program – it does phone home when it first starts, but I don’t know if that’s just to check for updates, to verify the licence remaining, or what the purpose is. I’ve blocked the phone home attempts without any issues.

    I don’t know if I’d pay $35 for it, but it does serve a purpose that isn’t covered completely by my other security software, it’s light on resources (uses 7 Mb memory on my XP system and I haven’t noticed any CPU usage until it pops up a warning), and it’s really easy to use (some people might be put off by the lack of options).

    I have it installed on a XP SP3 dual processor system. I also tried it on XP and Vista Virtual Machines and it worked well on those as well.

  10. jumbi

    Thanks Kumar for your comments!

    A user reported in Raymond that something strange appeared to Zemana’s new version (big difference in size), just before the free 3 day giveaway.

    Before 4 days was:
    v.192.163 size 4.612 kb

    and before 2 days and now is:
    v.192.164 size 6.832 kb

    What do you think of that?
    Should we be suspicious?

  11. YOran

    Have an issue with Zemana AntiLogger! Downloaded and rebooted several times and my xp SP3 machine went straight into a continuous reboot loop. Have checked against compatibiliy list available from software company’s web site and found no issue. Any suggestions!

  12. Ramesh Kumar

    Zemana Antilogger 1.9.2.164 versus SnoopFree Privacy Shield 1.07

    Antilogging is a security genre which is extremely important but relatively poorly understood. Unless you cover this security genre Trojans & Spyware can play havoc with you. Antilogging is a protection shield from badly behaved apps which hook onto your keyboard, use a keyboard filter driver, read a screen owned by that app or read a screen which is not owned by that app.

    I’ve been using SnoopFree Privacy Shield 1.07 with great satisfaction. It catches anyone who tries to breach in any of the above 4 ways. I wanted to try out Zemana Antilogger when it came in a giveaway for 3 days – courtesy http://www.dottech.org via Ozzie via billmullins.wordpress.com

    I tried to install it 12 times on my desktop WinXP SP2 32 bit operating system but failed. I am not bitter about it but it has aroused certain questions & possibly provided certain inferences as well. I compare here Zemana Antilogger with SnoopFree Privacy Shield 1.07. Both products are very different in terms of features & more importantly in the way they have been coded.

    SnoopFree Privacy Shield 1.07
    1) This program appears to be positioned as an antilogger
    2) This is coded to highlight a security breach based on heuristics (i.e. behaviour only)
    3) It does not highlight a security breach based upon a signature (malicious code) or a blacklist of programs (i.e. a specific list of harmful apps)
    4) It provides you a history log only for the current session & not for any past sessions
    5) It works only for WinXP. I am not sure if it covers all the avatars of Win XP – SP3, .NET, 64 bit & their permutations & combinations
    6) It has a simple helpfile which teaches that if an app is trying to hook to your keyboard or read your screen it is not necessarily bad & is in fact necessary if that app has hotkeys you need/use (keyboard hook) or menu visual effects if you find those essential (screenread). It teaches you to recognize good guys from bad guys to the extent possible

    Zemana Antilogger
    1) This program appears to be differently positioned i.e. antilogger cum antivirus cum antispyware cum anti id theft
    2) It appears to be coded to highlight a security breach based upon 3 different genres – heuristics (i.e. behaviour), signature (i.e. recognizing the code if malicious) & blacklist (i.e. a specific list of harmful apps)
    3) It provides you a history log but I do not know if the log is more elaborate or multisession in nature since the Zemana never opened
    4) It works on WinXP, Vista & Win7 but not on any 64bit operating system
    5) It provides a list of security software products it is not compatible with
    6) It claims to cover various security genres – SSL logging, Webcam logging, Clipboard logging, Screen logging & Malware (Viruses, Trojans, Spyware etc etc)

    Inferences
    1) I cannot compare features since I could not activate Zemana. I installed it exactly as guided by Ozzie (thanks again). I copied & even wrote down on paper the registration code. It asked me to restart my pc so that the installation wizard could complete its task.
    2) I restarted to find that Zemana icon appeared on my system tray. After that my booting just idled & never happened despite 12 restarts (over yesterday & today). Unless it started there was no way I could paste my license code into it.
    3) I cannot even confirm if Zemana could initialize properly since neither clicking its icon on the tray or restarting achieved results. I uninstalled & reinstalled 8 times.
    4) I opened up totally in order to install Zemana – including fully freeing up my parental control & web guard software – K9 Web Protection. I had uninstalled SnoopFree before installing Zemana since Zemana had stated that it was incompatible with SnoopFree. I could not be more open-door in my efforts to install Zemana
    5) Any antilogger (whether Zemana or SnoopFree) is a low level programme – low because it offers a kernel level protection – which happens to be at the most interior level of any operating system. Such apps necessarily have to bootup at startup whenever you turn on your pc. Their bootup & initialization has to be extremely quick so that they can quickly begin protecting you at an early stage

    So Which Is Better
    1) I infer that Zemana has been slightly indiscreet in its positioning & therefore in its coding. By plainly positioning itself in public view as an antilogger cum antivirus cum antispyware it has perhaps raised the hackles of apps which are antivirus and/or antispyware. Perhaps it should have been more discreet rather than trying to be more valorous
    2) Perhaps those very low level apps (antivirus and/or antispyware) prevented this app from initializing. Competitive pressures are a business reality.
    3) SnoopFree on the other hand is obviously a shrewder & more battlewise warrior who makes it a habit to win always. This reflects in its communications which are terse, clear, low profile & discreet. Depending only upon heuristics is a very shrewd thing! Obviously its coding is superior.
    4) By not declaring a blacklist you do not put people’s hackles up & may succeed precisely because of that
    5) Ultimately the better warrior in a fight to the finish is the one who gets up rather than one who continues to remain lying on the ground
    6) By the way SnoopFree victory is no flash in the pan. Bill Mullins at billmullins.wordpress.com (see Ozzie’s html link) himself says he was happy with SnoopFree & moved to Zemana only because SnoopFree only supported WinXP
    7) And so I feel SnoopFree is better than Zemana Antilogger 1.9.2.164
    Ramesh

  13. RoseD1st

    Yes a friend of mine had trouble so I tried to get one for him When I go to the registration page, the key box is empty??? Im not sure who we should report this to,edit I sent Zemana support the problem in an email

  14. Giovanni (King of Freebies after Ozzie...LOL!!)

    Hey Ashraf!!

    I have another question both for you and your redears: do you know if I can apply the LICENSE KEY after the deadline and then install ZEMANA ANTILOGGER on another PC afterwards??

  15. Orchid

    @ Jeffinprov…I found this on the Zemana AntiLogger Support Site:

    http://www.zemana.com/TFaq.aspx

    Q: Why don’t you offer a product for 64-bit Windows?
    A: AntiLogger is not available for Windows x64 (64-bit) operating systems.
    Microsoft extended the core of the operating system kernel in the x64 editions of Windows with KPP (Kernel Patch Protection – informally known as PatchGuard) in such a way that self-checks are routinely performed to detect tampering.

    The proactive protection provided by AntiLogger is not supported by the Windows x64 kernel. AntiLogger must make changes to the kernel to implement proactive protection. These changes are detected by PatchGuard as tampering, so the system will crash soon after AntiLogger is installed.
    If Microsoft ever removes PatchGuard from their x64 systems or provide some useful SDK available to security vendors, we’ll provide a 64-bit edition of AntiLogger.

    Hope that helps. :)

  16. Giovanni (King of Freebies after Ozzie...LOL!!)

    Hey Ashraf!!

    I used this program a few months ago after getting it for free as GAOTD and I was very impressed by its overall performance.

    It can detect ALL keylogging (yes ALL means ALL), webcam capture and screenshot capture methods from different trojans (Bifrost, Poison Ivy, The sHark, SpyNet, Bandook, Nuclear RAT) and frankly I think that just the shareware award-winning and very expensive indeed (120 $…LOL!) anti keylogger program called “PrivacyKeyboard” can beat it.

    So I highly recommend it!!

    However I was wondering whether or not it’s worth get rid of KEY SCRAMBLER that is currently installed on my PC.

    Maybe, given the low RAM quantity running on my old HOME PC right now, I’d better keep KEY SCRAMBLER rather than using this freebie….what do you make of it Ashraf??

    After all KEY SCRAMBLER is very effective too as tool to keep us safe from KeyLoggers, isn’t it??

    How many resources does this version of ZEMANA ANTILOGGER eat in terms of RAM and CPU usage??

    Finally, other FREE TOOLS, besides KEYSCRAMBLER, capable of beating KEYLOGGERS so as to protect our identity against this kind of cyberthreat, can be found here:

    http://www.raymond.cc/blog/archives/2007/09/20/how-to-beat-keyloggers-to-protect-your-identity/

    Were you aware of them, Ashraf??

    Eh,eh,eh…your friend RAYMOND ne sa una più del diavolo…opss sorry has more than one trick up his sleeve….LOL!!

    Enjoy!!

  17. Adder

    Looks like a good program. Just downloaded it and will install shortly. Thanks! :)

    @Denzel

    That 4MB shown on the Zemana website is either a misprint or was the size of a compressed version. If you click on the download button for your language, the download size is shown as 6.67MB.

  18. Jeffinprov

    This may be a “why is the sky blue” kind of question, but I continue to wonder: Why, at this stage of the game, are there seemingly high-end software products that don’t support 64-bit?

  19. Steve

    Hi! Everyone 013010

    As of 8:15am est Zemana is on the prowl on our system.

    Obtaining key, downloading file, and installation, went without a hitch.

    For Wheezer, I also have XpPro Sp3, AVG9 so we’ll see…..;)

    Started program:
    Updated key…………Okay, good to 30/1/2011
    Searched for updates…Already up to date

    Has already asked for permissions, and granted for
    Open Office clipboard, and clean mem.

    Will have to inform DW on procedures.

  20. Wheezer

    It didn’t seem to like running on my system. XP pro, sp3.

    I’ve got a bunch of stuff on it and don’t know where the problem came from, but programs weren’t running right.

    Uninstalled.

    It does look like it’d be a good program tho if it’ll run ok.

  21. jumbi

    Has someone else tried it, perhaps in the past?

    I got terrible problems with keyscrambler (described on that page here in dottech) and looking for an alternative. I had found that freebie in Raymond from 25 Jan but haven’t found in depth reviews or experiences…

  22. Ramesh Kumar

    Wow this looks great!

    However I seek a few clarifications regarding which genres of key logging protection is offered by this software. Does it protect against the following problems?

    1) If an app reads its own window?
    2) If an app reads a window which the app does not own?
    3) Does it protect against keyboard hooks?
    4) Does it protect against keyboard filter drivers?

    Does it provide the following features?
    1) It tells you which app & which file for that app (exe etc, & its filepath) is doing the mischief? It allows you to pinpointedly block that
    2) It allows you to restrict that app totally, partially or not at all? e.g. you can permit it to read its own window but not unowned windows and/or hook your keyboard
    3) It allows you to reset permissions fully or partially for that app?

    I say this because it is not a blanket rule that keylogging should always only be fully disabled. Sometimes disabling a keylogger also disables all hotkeys for that app. Does this app allow you to disable key logging without disabling its hotkeys?

    Likewise can one disable screen read without disabling its the menu effects of that app(another unintended consequence!)? Depends upon how the app is coded.

    Ramesh