NSA is capable of hacking Wi-Fi connections from 8 miles away, says report

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Thanks to a presentation done on the surveillance abilities that the NSA possesses, by Jacob Applebaum, at the Chaos Communications Congress, we know that it is possible for the NSA to infiltrate your Wi-Fi from up to 8 miles away.

Applebaum, who also co-wrote the article in Der Spiegel which shed light on the catalog that the NSA had, went into more depth during his presentation and gave information on some of the hacking devices that the NSA were using in their surveillance.

Some of the devices he talked about include ones capable of taking over the various iOS platforms, intercepting communications with phones that are using GSM, and also another device which allows the user to hack Wi-Fi connections from a distance of 8 miles away — a device that has been “deployed in the field” already. There is even a possibility, for the last device, to be used via drones.

Already there are investigations being done by those affected by NSA surveillance. Cisco, one of the companies in which the NSA installed backdoors into its products, is doing just that.

“On Monday, December 30th, Der Spiegel magazine published additional information about the techniques allegedly used by NSA TAO to infiltrate the technologies of numerous IT companies,” Cisco’s senior VP John Stewart wrote. “As a result of this new information coming to light, the Cisco Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) has opened an investigation.”

We don’t expect these investigations to result in much of anything. Why? Simply because in today’s day and age, national security tops all — whether you like it or not.

[via The Verge, Der Spiegel, image via frederic.jacobs’ flickr]

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9 comments

  1. New Moon

    My emails arrive half a day or two late. Now I know why lol.

    Light from very far galaxies arrive to Earth billions of years later, still intact with all the information. Astronomers are clever enough to capture and make sense of it. Yeah we know that!

    Somehow, the light and radio waves are the same, but for the radio waves you just can’t see it. If humans are clever enough to capture EM wave from billions of light year away in tact and analyze it, why do you think they can’t hack your wifi from 8 miles away? Having sex before marriage is not ok (to many), but having sex after marriage is ok. Men can be topless, women can’t. Do certain things with right hand but not left one. When the boss lies, it’s ok, when the employees do, it’s not.

    I’m talking about double standard in people’s general knowledge. NSA should be able to hack any wifi anywhere on Earth from anywhere in the solar system. Until then, they don’t know what they’re talking about!

  2. Peter

    [@Ashraf] “… any competent intelligence agency of a country…”
    Unfortunately we did not get anything like that here in germany. They still seem to think that everything starting with “NS” does not deserve attention; it is embarrassing an humiliating.

  3. Ashraf
    Mr. Boss

    [@Mike S.] Aside from epeen wars in the press, I don’t think revelations about NSA actions have had any major affect on US relations with other countries. Or, at least they shouldn’t because any competent intelligence agency of a country would know the capabilities of its rivals abroad and what they can and can’t do. In other words, this really shouldn’t be news to them. Rather, I feel NSA actions have weakened the trust many (although maybe not the majority of) Americans have in their government.

  4. Mike S.

    In its zeal to protect the U.S., one can’t help but wonder if the NSA instead has weakened matters by other countries understandably going national in their approaches, to the Internet, underlying software, and otherwise rather than relying on U.S.-oriented and based operations.