“Preparing for your digital afterlife” [Infographic]

preparing-digital-afterlife-large

This is probably the best infographic in a long while. What happens to our social media profiles after we kick the bucket? The only persons who should care much about this are those who share a lot of personal information online. BTW, do you notice that only Google states that it does not guarantee access to the account of a deceased family member? It seems your personal information might just make Google money after you’re long gone.

[via Whoishostingthis]

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  • Meredith

    I can’t believe Twitter has as many verification requirements as Paypal. Don’t most people who use Twitter never pass on any financial information through it? And I have trouble seeing how an account containing nothing more than 180 character tweets could be considered so confidential. Then again, I guess I wouldn’t want someone getting into my account and tweeting random stuff after I’m gone… I wonder if places that partner with Amazon cloud storage like http://thetriggerbox.com/ manage social media information as well as bank account stuff as well. There certainly is a lot of potential in companies who could take care of all of that for you.

  • Maria

    It’s good to see that Google is finally catching up with tools like ‘Inactive Account Manager’ – This issue will become more and more important in future and it’s good to see that it’s finally becoming mainstream.. Tool from Google is good, but it solves this problem on one platform – Google. Our life however has digital footprints at many places and a solution from providers such as Google is a step in right direction, but is not sufficient for our complex digital life. Nowadays there are many online products that can help in managing digital estate. I found one of them here http://www.wfaa.com/good-morning-texas/Tech-Tuesday-Social-media-wills-151526665.html called http://www.plannedDeparture.com . But the bigger issue is of awareness and posts like these are helpful.