[Review] PCMedik

{rw_text}Software reviewed in this article:

PCMedik

Version reviewed:

6.8.30.2010

Software description as per the developer:

PCMedik 6 sets the standard for PC repair and optimization software. One of the first and most comprehensive products to increase computer performance, it increases overall speed and squeezes out every last bit of performance your computer is capable of. PCMedik also locates and repairs problems with software and hardware incompatibilities which lead to loss of computer performance and stability. Very easy to use, fully compliant with the latest versions of Microsoft ® Windows and brings new life to your computer. Take your existing computer and revitalize it the easy way.

Download size:

1.8 MB

Supported OS:

Windows 2000 and higher

Price:

$13.99 (USD)

Ashraf’s note:

For what it is worth, PCMedik is the exact same program as PCHeal, which is distributed under a different developer.

{/rw_text} –>

{rw_good}

  • Easy to use.
  • Allows users to select from two different methods of optimization/cleaning: “Heal” and/or “Heal & Boost”.
  • Automatically detects computer configuration (such as what Windows you are running).
  • Users can rollback any changes/optimizations made.

{/rw_good} –>

{rw_bad}

  • Lacks proper details about what exactly it is doing.
  • Users are not allowed to select which changes they want to be made.
  • Shows no warnings to users who try to run optimizations/changes based on the wrong Windows/CPU selections.

{/rw_bad} –>

{rw_score}
{for=”Ease of Use” value=”10″}Very easy to use; you literally only have to click a few buttons and you don’t need any technical knowledge.
{/for}
{for=”Performance” value=”1″}Does not have any noticeable effect on PC performance and lacks proper details on what exactly the program is doing.
{/for}
{for=”Usefulness” value=”2″}Eh. I assume the developer tried to make this program very simple to attract users. However, in my opinion, the developer made it so simple that most, if not all, users will stay away from this program (because even the most computer illiterate like to know what is happening to their computer).
{/for}
{for=”Price” value=”9″}$13.99 is a very, very low price when compared to other PC optimization/cleaning tools.
{/for}
{for=”Final Score” value=”2″}
{/for}
{/rw_score} –>

{rw_verdict}[tdown]
{/rw_verdict} –>

It seems like everybody and their grandmother is developing PC “maintenance” and/or “repair” and/or “optimization” tools. Thankfully, out of the horde of PC “maintenance” and/or “repair” and/or “optimization” tools there are some top-tier software that shine and help us truly manage our computers. Unfortunately PCMedik is not of them.

PCMedik is a tool that aims to make it very easy to optimize/repair your computer – you literally only have to make a few clicks and PCMedik will do its thing. Heck, it is so easy even a caveman could do it (ha-ha). This is what PCMedik’s main program window looks like:

PCMedik gives users three options to set:

  • The operating system (Windows 2000/2003/2008/7/XP/Vista)
  • The the type of processor (Intel, AMD, or “Unknown/Other”)
  • The type of repair PCMedik should conduct (“Heal” or “Heal & Boost”)

The first two – OS and processor type – are automatically detected by PCMedik, but you are still given the ability to change them. The later option – the “Repair Setting” – users need to set. However, selecting which “Repair Setting” to use isn’t rocket science; there are only two settings you can select: “Heal” or “Heal & Boost”. What exactly are the differences between “Heal” and “Heal & Boost”? Well, the help file states:

The ‘Heal & Boost’ setting uses the most optimal settings for your computer. When PcMedik was developed the ‘Heal’ setting was degraded down to use average boost settings, the ‘Heal & Boost’ setting on the other hand will use all performance settings available for your computer.

However, in actuality no one really knows. And this last sentence of mine sums up the problem with PCMedik: No one really knows what changes/optimizations PCMedik makes.

After you set all the three settings, and hit “GO”, PCMedik starts doing its thing…

…and after PCMedik is done, it asks you to restart your computer:

After you restart your computer that is it – you are done; there is no report saying “PCMedik changes blah, blah, blah, and cleaned blah, blah blah” or anything similar. Prior to starting the optimization/cleaning, you are not told what changes PCMedik will make to your computer (and thus you don’t have the ability to be selective about what changes it will make) and after the optimization/cleaning has finished you are not given any sort of report of what changes are made. Simply put, you don’t know what changes PCMedik makes to your computer. (I suppose one could sit there and read off all the status updates [i.e. the “Querying Modem” you see two screenshots up] that are provided while PCMedik is performing the optimization/cleaning, but even those updates do not provide very much information.)

Now, PCMedik’s help file does provide a list of “modifications” that PCMedik makes:

  • Maximum and minimum file cache
  • Memory swap file/conservative swap file
  • Windows animation settings
  • Legacy Windows support
  • File allocation size and buffers
  • Windows system resources
  • Boot optimization
  • Application priority level
  • Device drivers
  • Software incompatibilities
  • and much more…

However, providing a list of a modifications in the help file is no substitute for showing the user exactly what changes will be made prior to the optimization/cleaning and providing the user with a report after the optimization/cleaning has finished that lists exactly what changes were made.

Assuming the developer made PCMedik like it is now in order to make it extremely easy to use. However, if the developer was going to do this, there should have at least been some sort of “Advanced Mode” which allows users to view the details of what PCMedik does and allows users to be selective about what changes are made.

To add salt to the wound, PCMedik has no noticeable effect on computer performance what-so-ever. That is not to say it does not make any changes to your computer; it does make changes like in the registry. Rather, that means don’t expect your computer to be blazing fast after running PCMedik because you will be sorely disappointed if you do. Granted, I was only able to use “Heal” and not “Heal & Boost” (since “Heal & Boost” is not available in the trial version), but still I don’t expect “Heal & Boost” to do anything spectacular either. Even if PCMedik did greatly improve computer performance – which it doesn’t – I would still be wary of the program since it does not provide proper details on what changes it makes to your computer.

Two other things to note about PCMedik:

  • After you have run PCMedik, you can go back and undo the changes PCMedik made. To undo the changes PCMedik made, click the “Restore” button (located next to the “GO” button).
  • PCMedik gives no type of warning to users who try to optimize/clean their computers based on the wrong Windows/CPU selections. For example, I changed the “Processor Type” from Intel to AMD and ran PCMedik. You would think this incorrect processor selection would cause some sort of hiccup during the optimization/cleaning process, or at least the user would be prompted with something like “WARNING: You have select the wrong processor type”. However, nothing of the sort happens. Indeed this lack-of-action by PCMedik raises questions if PCMedik truly performs different optimizations/cleaning for different OSes/CPUs or if the OS and processor selection is just a marketing gimmick.

PCMedik is a tool that claims it “sets the standard for PC repair and optimization software”. If PCMedik is the standard, I feel sorry for that software industry. (It isn’t the standard.)

This review was conducted on a laptop running Windows 7 Professional 32-bit. The specs of the laptop are as follows: 3GB of RAM, a Radeon HD 2600 512MB graphics card, and an Intel T8300 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo processor.

{rw_freea}

All the following are system utilities/PC optimizers/PC cleaners:

{/rw_freea} –>

{rw_verdict2}I don’t know if the developer is trying to pull a fast one over us, or if he/she truly believes this is the best way to conduct PCMedik. Either way, this program is rubbish; thumbs down and rejected! If you are looking for good, quality PC maintenance programs, grab any of the ones listed under “Free Alternatives” – all of them are time tested (except for IObit Toolbox, which is fairly new), user-friendly, and known to perform well.
{/rw_verdict2} –>

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15 comments

  1. Josh

    I shall avoid not only this product, but anything else related to PGWARE in future. The review and comments on this page illustrate just why it is a worthwhile addition to my list of favorite sites.
     
    Regarding these “one-click” maintenance and performance applications: They invariably reset or change settings that you have previously modified. This leaves you with the tiresome task of checking all your settings and manually readjusting them again. No computer program could possibly know why I had opted for specific settings in the first place. To allow a utility to make changes without offering you any choices or without telling you what it does, requires somewhat of a kamikaze attitude. Therefore, despite the lure of convenience, I avoid them like bad breath.
     
    If you want to fiddle with your system, you should use reputable programs which offer an array of optional settings, along with short descriptions of each one and a feature to reset or change them individually later. This is less convenient and somewhat time consuming, but, as far as these things are concerned, there is little gain without the pain.

  2. hipockets

    First, Thanks, Ashraf, for your site and the work that you put into it.  It’s a “Must Go To” site for me.
    Second, It might be a good idea to add an EULA paragraph/section/comment to your Quick Reviews (which I like, by the way!).  I’m sure that many of your followers  forget about the importance of reading the EULA (me included until today).
    Third, I hope you don’t mind, but I quoted your “Final Verdict” on GAOTD today.
    Fourth, Keep up the good work!
     
     
     

  3. Mike

    Wow–talk about a potential disaster in the making with this software-an unknown/untested developer and software doing heaven knows what to your computer.  And then, to top it off, the user gets to pay the developer $500 (at least initially) to do an audit at your house.  Should go onto everyone’s computer …
     
    Ashraf, I think the reason why Trev thought this could be a Rapid Review is that the software is an automatic Reject, given what is does; do not pass Go, do not collect $200.

  4. Anna

    CCleaner newer gave problems to me, I used it about 6 years by now.
    Glary Utilities and Advanced System Care
    removed to much from my registry, it gave me troubles.
    After resetting the registry it was oke again.

  5. Trev

    @Ashraf: #3
    That makes sense now I think about it.
    If you publicly thumbs down/find fault/condemn something I guess you have to explain why. People are more content/(or even less upset) with the opinion. I forgot about that.
    Means work for you though, writing.

  6. ebony

    This SW is just the kind of thing that makes me ask so many questions
    It does what?
    How much control do I have?
    Can I undo what has been done?
    How do I know if it is doing anything at all?
    and now I have another one, AUDIT??? on my dime, and trust you to reimburse?????????!!!!
    This is one of those time when EULAlyzer  comes in very handy.
    DotTech is awesome.

  7. AUDITPIGWARE

    Wheezer
    As was also pointed out by “Jim Stone” in the comments section on GOTD, another thing that potential users should consider is in their license agreement:
    13. AUDIT. You agree that on PGWARE’s request you will certify in writing your compliance with the terms of this license, including your use of the Software only on the number of computers licensed. You also agree that we may perform an audit which may include examination of your physical premises with prior written notice, and that any audit conducted will be paid for at your expense including an initial U.S $500 investigation fee. Provided that an audit determines all computer licenses have been legally obtained you will be refunded any audit expenses incurred.
    I just can’t think of a polite comment to make after reading that…

    WOW!!!!

  8. Wheezer

    As was also pointed out by “Jim Stone” in the comments section on GOTD, another thing that potential users should consider is in their license agreement:

    13. AUDIT. You agree that on PGWARE’s request you will certify in writing your compliance with the terms of this license, including your use of the Software only on the number of computers licensed. You also agree that we may perform an audit which may include examination of your physical premises with prior written notice, and that any audit conducted will be paid for at your expense including an initial U.S $500 investigation fee. Provided that an audit determines all computer licenses have been legally obtained you will be refunded any audit expenses incurred.

    I just can’t think of a polite comment to make after reading that…

  9. Ashraf
    Author/Mr. Boss

    @Trev: Respectively, I disagree. PCHand Media Converter Pro was a prefect example of a rapid review; it is a generic media converter which I don’t need to explain bit by bit but rather just tell what features it has and any shortcomings; and it is a terrific software so I didn’t have to back my verdict with detailed proof – saying why it is terrific is good enough.

    On the other hand PCMedik has some fundamental problems with it. I have to explain to people what these problems are and why I am giving this a thumbs down – I can’t just say “oh PCMedik is bad, don’t get it”, because that wouldn’t be very credible. If I am going to condemn a software, I have to explain why I am condemning it.

    @Gioneo: Nah, the review on PCHand Media Converter Pro (http://dottech.org/shareware-reviews/rapid/18150) was the official first rapid review.

  10. Gioneo

    Yep. Double thumbs down. If I can’t know what it’s doing or did, I don’t want it messing with my system. I mean sure, it’s always a good habit to backup or create a restore point prior to using any type of optimization/repair software, still it’s not nice to be “kept in the dark”!
    I’m guessing this is your first “official” rapid review… Good deal.