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[Windows 8] Bring scientific calculator functions to your computer with Calculator²

Posted By Locutus On September 20, 2012 @ 1:30 AM In Windows | 1 Comment

[1]Many people use scientific calculators only once or twice a month. This means that the rest of the time, they’re sitting, occupying space, for vast amounts of time. Ditch the physical device and start using your extremely powerful computer as a calculating machine with Calculator² for Windows 8.

One of my favorite things about Calculator² is that it doesn’t overdo anything. By default, it’s in boring four-button calculator mode, with standard memory and history functions being the only special features. When you go to the menu and select Scientific, it all but relaunches, and out appears a large swath of scientific functions, ranging from X² to sech^-1.

There are also a huge set of constants to use. What’s the molar mass of Carbon? Calculator² knows! There are an array of chemical, astronomical, nuclear, electromagnetic, mathematical, and physio-chemical constants for you to choose from, leading one to believe the developer of Calculator² is currently taking courses on physics.

Overall, Calculator² is fairly nice. The ad in the top left alternating between lime green and bright red is quite annoying, however, and the lack of graphing functions is annoying as well. However, for basic scientific and four button calculator needs, Calculator² is the perfect app for your computer.

Price: Free!

Last updated: unknown

Supported OS: Windows 8

Supported processors: x86/x64/ARM

Download size: 1.8MB

Calculator² on Windows Store [2]


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[1] Image: http://dottech.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/calc2.png

[2] Calculator² on Windows Store: http://apps.microsoft.com/webpdp/en-US/app/calculator/ea13786d-2250-49d0-9116-78b16575b7ec

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