“A procrastinator’s guide to a proactive lifestyle” [Comic]

Are you a procrastinator? Don’t be ashamed. Am I a procrastinator? I’ll tell you later. The artist from Something of that Ilk apparently is part of the clan because s/he has an epic comic that hits so close to home I cannot even put words to it. If you are indeed a procrastinator, you will probably appreciate the comic. Check it out:

Hahahahahaha…

[via Something of that Ilk]

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8 comments

  1. Eric989

    @Ashraf: Of course one of the downsides of using “they” is that there are about 50 bazillion people that still insist it is not correct just because it used to not be correct. I wonder if people had this problem in the “shall” vs “will” days?

  2. Eric989

    @Suze: I am saying that I read a while back that a growing number of english language authorities/professors are starting to accept “they have” as a singular phrase referring to a single person of unknown gender. The “have” changes in the same way that no one says “You has” even if “you” is singular. Some popular writing guides now prefer using “they” instead of the “s/he” alternatives.

  3. Suze

    @Eric989: I, for one, was pleased to read “s/he” as I was reading Ashraf’s description. Although “they” could be used, the corresponding verb would need to be plural. In this case, Ashraf was referring to the artist (singular), where “they” would not have made sense, given the verb he used was singular.

    Ashraf, thanks for my Monday laugh :)

  4. Eric989

    I am sad to find out you use “s/he”. You lost respect for me when I dissed Tetris, and now I lose an equal amount of respect for you for perpetuating the use of “s/he” or any of its derivatives. I am joking, kinda. It is starting to be much more officially accepted by the language police to use “they” as singular for a person of unknown gender. Finally, the country folk’s solution is being more accepted as proper.