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May 21, 2010
9:17 PM
calebstein
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Here, I will post various lessons on how to do stuff on FreeBSD (I assume I am the only one here that uses BSD on a regular basis).

For our first lesson, we will be installing FreeBSD on a computer already running Windows.  (I apologize for lack of screenshots, I don’t have any.)  First, you should burn a Gparted cd, available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gparted/files/gparted-live-stable/0.5.2-9/gparted-live-0.5.2-9.iso/download and burn it to a cd.  You can use ImgBurn to burn the cd, ImgBurn can be downloaded from http://imgburn.com/index.php?act=download and be sure to select mirror six.  At this point, you should backup your data.  I cannot be liable for damage to your data.  Next, put your Gparted cd into your drive and boot from it.  Once it boots, (be sure to accept all the default options), you should see your partition table.  Resize your Windows partition.  You should allocate at least 5GB for FreeBSD.  Please try to make sure that your FreeBSD partition is located at the end of the hard drive.  Do not format your FreeBSD partition.  Now, restart your computer and remove the cd before it is booted.  You should boot into Windows.  In Windows, you should download the FreeBSD cd.  Go to http://freebsd.org/ (the same steps apply to Windows 7).  Once you boot into Windows, download and install EasyBCD, from http://neosmart.net/dl.php?id=1.  (If you have trouble with the link, try removing the period from the end of it.)  Run EasyBCD, and click “Add/Remove Entries.”  Click the button that says “Linux” (it should be at the bottom).  Select “FreeBSD” from the dropdown list, and then select the last item on the drive select (it should say BSD at the beginning).  Now reboot, and you should see a new menu with Windows and FreeBSD listed on it.  Now you can select to boot into Windows or FreeBSD at boot time.

It's me
May 21, 2010
11:51 PM
Adrian
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@calebstein – maybe you should email the article to Ashraf and ask him to post it on the main blog.

May 22, 2010
9:08 AM
calebstein
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Adrian said:

@calebstein – maybe you should email the article to Ashraf and ask him to post it on the main blog.


That’s a very good idea Smile
It's me
May 22, 2010
10:01 AM
calebstein
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For our next lesson, we will be installing a working KDE4 desktop environment.  Once again, I apologize for lack of screenshots.  KDE is a complete desktop environment.  Of all the desktops for UNIX, KDE will be most familiar to Windows users.

First, boot into FreeBSD and login as root.  At this point, you should add a new user account by typing “adduser” (without quotes) and accepting the defaults.  Just be sure to type “wheel” (without quotes) when you are asked what group to add the user to.  Now you should install sudo by typing “pkg_add -r sudo” (without quotes).  Now, type “pkg_add -r kde4″ and then “pkg_add -r xorg” (both without quotes).  Now you should configure Xorg by typing “X -configure” (without quotes).  Then type “mv /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf” (without quotes, and the command is case sensitive).  Now type “edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf” (without quotes), and add the following lines to the bottom:

Section “ServerFlags”

option “AutoAddDevices” “off”

option “AllowEmptyInput” “off”

EndSection

 Then press escape, select “leave editor,” and choose to save your changes.

Now, type “edit /etc/rc.conf” (without quotes), and add the following lines:

dbus_enable=”YES”

local_startup=”${local_startup} /usr/local/kde4/etc/rc.d”

kdm4_enable=”YES”

Now, if you plan on using the terminal often, which you will be doing if you follow there tutorials, you should type “pkg_add -r xfce4″ (without quotes).  You do this because KDE’s Konsole will start to crash after you run it once, but XFCE’s won’t, so you should run XFCE’s terminal once you start using KDE.  Now you are done, and you just have to reboot, and wait for KDM to start.  You must login as the user you created earlier.  If you ever want to run a command as root, just put “sudo” (without quotes) before it.

It's me
May 22, 2010
11:48 AM
Locutus
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calebstein said:

Adrian said:

@calebstein – maybe you should email the article to Ashraf and ask him to post it on the main blog.


That’s a very good idea Smile
 

 

I’d think you need screenshots if you want to do that.  Try it in a VM, see how that works out! Laugh

Oh, the site that was :(
May 22, 2010
11:52 AM
calebstein
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Locutus said:

calebstein said:

Adrian said:

@calebstein – maybe you should email the article to Ashraf and ask him to post it on the main blog.


That’s a very good idea Smile

 


I’d think you need screenshots if you want to do that.  Try it in a VM, see how that works out! Laugh

Ok, I’ll try it in a VM soon.  (Tomorrow)
It's me
May 23, 2010
5:00 PM
calebstein
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Forum Posts: 445
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November 22, 2009
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calebstein said:

Locutus said:

calebstein said:

Adrian said:

@calebstein – maybe you should email the article to Ashraf and ask him to post it on the main blog.


That’s a very good idea Smile
 

I’d think you need screenshots if you want to do that.  Try it in a VM, see how that works out! Laugh

Ok, I’ll try it in a VM soon.  (Tomorrow)

And by tomorrow (actually today), I mean next time I get the chance.  But now it’s time for more lessons Laugh
It's me
March 16, 2012
4:44 PM
RedneckUncleElminster
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Nice to know another sane user of a Unix-based OS. I personally prefer Linux (Mint and/or Arch), but to each his own.

 

By sane user, I mean someone who doesn’t feel like they have to go toe-to-toe with Micro$oft to prove they have a good program. Not a windows basher who forgets to even point out the good things about both OSes. Too many people do that. Though I’d have to keep Windows 8 in classic mode (good thing it has both 7-like and 9x-like modes in it).

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