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Life span of DVDs and other recordable media
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March 15, 2010
2:18 PM
karen
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DVD-R and CD-R “write-once” last longer than their respective -RW format write-many”.

 

This is from an artical about archival for librarians (which may be more than you need), but to quote “RW [...] discs are generally not considered for long-term or
archival use”

http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/sec4.html – Here’s the full article which discusses the alloys and such used on the various disks.

Here’s an article from PCWorld stating that burned CDs may only have a lifespan of 2 to 5 years.  I couldn’t find a date on it though:  http://www.pcworld.com/article/124312/do_burned_cds_have_a_short_life_span.html

But here is another forum posts (seems knowledgeable) that suggests that high-quality, properly stored (temp, humidity, and no exposure to sunlight) media will last much longer:  http://forums.afterdawn.com/thread_view.cfm/708817

 

Google “DVD longevity” if you want to find more links.

 

 

March 15, 2010
3:15 PM
Refpeuk
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I have also heard that your DVD collection can also wear out within 5 years.

 

Thanks for the info, I didn’t know that “RW” discs lasted a shorter time than plan “R”s

Any comments? Questions? Outbursts?
March 15, 2010
3:37 PM
Mags
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@ Karen

 

I probably should have posted my comment from another forum in here (How does one copy .exe insallers….)

 

I more or less said the same thing you did about storage.

 

Another point about RW’s (I haven’t read the articles yet so forgive me if this is mentioned in them) is that the more you rewrite to them the higher the chance of the wearing out.  Another point is that when deleting, what is deleted still stays on the disk until eventually the disk is showing full, even if you know that the data stored on them doesn’t fill the disk.

 

March 15, 2010
5:45 PM
karen
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Apparently the best ones (CD or DVD) are the the ones that have a gold alloy.  You can’t tell by looking at the color of the disk, though it should be on the label and you’ll pay more for them.  The gold alloy resists corrosion much better than the alloys used in the cheaper disks.

And there apparently is a difference between CD/DVDs you buy (which are stamped/prints, I didn’t quite understand) and CD/DVDs you burn, in which the laser is burning the surface which causes some sort of chemical reaction which is how the data is saved.  I definitely didn’t understand everything in those articles I posted.

March 15, 2010
6:02 PM
karen
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Here is the link to the table of contents for the first link I posted above:  http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/contents.html.  It is titled “Care and Handling of CDs and DVDs:  A Guide for Librarians and Archivists”.

March 15, 2010
6:06 PM
karen
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From that same source mentioned above

March 15, 2010
6:41 PM
karen
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And here is some valuable advice from the archiving link above:

CD-R,
CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW. DVD+RW, and DVD-RAM
discs can become unusable in a matter of days. If such a
disc is left in an environment that allows direct
sunlight
and extreme heat buildup (e.g., on the dashboard of a
car
in summertime, or next to a heater by a window), the
organic
dye or phase-changing film that holds the data will
degrade
quickly, causing the disc to become unreadable. A disc
is
not protected from the effects of heat buildup if left
in
a case that is exposed to direct sunlight or other
sources
of heat. Extreme heat buildup can also cause warping of
the
disc.

March 16, 2010
4:04 PM
Pwnana
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IMHonestO, re-writable DVDs are entirely obsolete and will probably die out soon, just like the HDDVD.  USB drives, while a little more expensive in the short run, are far more reusable, portable, durable, and reliable, in addition to all the things you said.

 

I didn’t know the DVD+RW or DVD-RW made a difference, I thought it was just the manufacturer’s preference.  Whats the difference?

You got Pwnd
March 16, 2010
4:45 PM
karen
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  • The DVD-R/RW standard was developed by Pioneer, and is used primarily by Apple and Pioneer. These “minus“ discs can only be written to in one layer on the discs surface. In addition, this format is supported by the DVD forum, but is in no way an  industry standard. DVD-R/RW discs are cheaper than the “plus” format.
  • The DVD+R/RW format is supported by Philips, Dell, Sony, HP, and Microsoft. These discs can be written to in multiple layers, giving them slightly better and more disc storage than the  “minus“ format. Because of this additional capacity, they are slightly more expensive than “minus“ discs.
  •  

March 18, 2010
6:14 AM
Ramesh Kumar
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DVD-R- is compatible with about 93% of all DVD Players and most DVD-ROMs.

DVD-RW – is compatible with about  80% of all DVD Players and most DVD-ROMs.

DVD-R and DVD-RW supports single side 4.37 computer GB* DVDs(called DVD-5) and double sided 8.75 computer GB* DVDs(called DVD-10).

These formats are supported by DVDForum.

 

DVD+R – is compatible with about 89% of all DVD Players and most DVD-ROMs.

DVD+RW – is compatible with about  79% of all DVD Players and most DVD-ROMs.

DVD+R and DVD+RW supports single side 4.37 computer GB* DVDs(called DVD-5) and double side 8.75 computer GB* DVDs(called DVD-10).

These formats are supported by the DVD+RW Alliance.

 

The painful part is that one needs to know beforehand which player plays which one. Ugh! Frown

Fortunately http://www.videohelp.com/dvdpl…..it2=Search tells which player plays which.

 RameshSmile

 

 

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