Angry elephant teaches lions a lesson [Amazing Photo of the Day]

King of the jungle, they are called. Scary, they are. Big teeth, they have. Fast, they can be. But does that deter an angry elephant from chasing after a pair of lions? Heck no! In fact, the elephant in the following photograph may be proving a point — my husks are bigger than yours, jerks. Check it out:

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9 comments

  1. redmaledeer

    The picture reminds me of an old joke. A lion demands of various animals who is the king of the jungle. The monkey, and so on, all of them meekly say that of course the lion is the king of the jungle. Finally the lion gets to the elephant. The elephant picks him up in his trunk, bashes him into ground several times, and tosses the lion over the nearest tree. As the battered and bruised lion crawls away he says, “Well, you didn’t have to get so angry just because you don’t know the answer.”

    Enjoy.

  2. Eric989

    @AFPhys: I remember seeing a map of where different animals made their habitat and there was a place in Africa where lions and gorillas nearly touched, but the gorillas stayed in the jungle and the lions stayed out in the more open areas. I have never heard of a fight between a gorilla and a lion so maybe lions don’t go into jungles, at least there.
    I just remembered something else that may be very relevant to this. Sometime in the last 5 years or so I saw a program about the first tiger kill caught on camera. There had been videos taken on tigers eating their kills and stuff like that, but prior to 5 years ago, no one had ever captured the entire hunt. My point is that it is much harder to film in the jungle (where the tigers are) than it is in open areas where you can stay in vehicles and can film stuff a long ways away without trees blocking your sight. So maybe the tv people focus on lions in open areas because there are so many of them and they are easy to film there, rather than trying to find a few brief glimpses of a lion in a jungle somewhere. They have to film the tigers in the jungle because that is where most of them are found.
    Maybe there are populations of lions in jungles but they are largely ignored due to logistics and the fact that there are plenty of lions in better areas to film.

  3. AFPhys

    @Eric989: I agree with you and Ashraf … The lion is “the king of the jungle”, though only God knows how that appellation came about. Seems that from the earliest days that I have seen them more in desert or savanna areas.

    Maybe jungle is always adjacent to savanna and desert?

  4. Eric989

    Are Ashraf and I the only ones that have heard that the lion is the king of the jungle? Seriously, I have heard that thousands of times. Maybe this isn’t a well known saying everywhere in the world (and why should it be since it it false) but living in the USA, I hear it all the time.

  5. Eric989

    I never really understood why lions are called the king of the jungle. Jungle must be used very loosely. King of the wild or something like that would make more sense because lions don’t live in jungles as far as I know. I have watched countless programs about lions and have yet to see one in a jungle. They live in open grasslands and feed on prairie animals. Sure, there are trees but it is no jungle. Of course some few lions may have wondered into a jungle and may still be there but that is not their primary habitat. Tigers live in jungles.
    I just remembered that some Asiatic lions have been reintroduced into India. I really don’t know what type of land that is and it may be a jungle, but still when you think of a lion you are thinking of the African ones and not those sickly Asiatic ones. They are sickly due to very a small population and massive inbreeding.