Microsoft’s next Xbox will block used games and require an Internet connection [Rumor]

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The next-generation of video game consoles is closer than ever, with Sony rumored to announced their next PlayStation in 2 weeks. Microsoft probably didn’t want Sony to hog all the limelight, and fortunately for them some more news about the next Xbox has surfaced — it might be not good news, however.

A report from Edge says that the next Xbox won’t be allowed to play used games. Games on disc will ship with one-time-use activation codes, making the games useless to anyone except the first person that purchased it — effectively eliminating the used games market for the console. But will that also mean people won’t be able to lend each other games anymore? And if the codes are tied to your account, does that mean people in the same household would have to purchase their own “license” to play the game, unless they use your account to play? Yikes.

The report also mentions that the console, which is codenamed Durango, will require an Internet connection to use. I know most of us have constant connections to the Internet and that won’t be a problem. But what about those people that don’t? Is Microsoft saying that they simply don’t want to sell their console to that subset of people? And for the people with Internet connections at home, there is still the possibility of service interruptions. Would that mean no single-player games for you until you’re connected to the Internet?

So many questions. But hopefully for all the gamers out there, Microsoft provides some alternatives.

What do you think? Are these requirements overkill? Let us know in the comments!

[via Edge, Kotaku]

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9 comments

  1. Enrique
    Author/Staff

    @JonE: Yup, they’ll be losing a significant audience going online-only. I understand that used games (and piracy) are hurting the industry, but to alienate that many people? I hope that they don’t do it, but it might be the only way.

  2. BlackWing

    Hmm this seems a bit fishy as Sony was the first and as far as I am aware to have put this patent in place a few months back. So unless Microsoft have a license from Sony…we can see a lawsuit very soon. There is one hopeful idiot saying Sony won’t do this, weird then why put in the patent in the first place.

  3. JonE

    And just how many people do they figure will buy this strangled machine?

    Or perhaps I’m not understanding what I just read. I haven’t bought a game machine for nearly twenty years and of course the technology has changed and many are streaming games, but I’m not understanding what Microsoft’s end goal here is.

    And as popular as streaming is becoming there are still those that buy games and then trade with friends, as the article states, or perhaps some have turned into groups; can’t blame them too much with the high cost of quality games and equipment.

    Which begs the question has someone in Microsoft lost their mind? With the questionable marketing of a recent OS and now a game machine one has to wonder.

  4. baba

    Dat is pure discriminatie …de minder goed bedeelden “geen internet , na lang sparen de xbox kunnen kopen en de “dure” spelletjes , worden hier de dupe van .Soms is dat het enige wat minder goed bedeelden hun kinderen kunnen geven …
    Wordt hier de klassestrijd – onderscheid- tussen welvaart en armoede nog eens verdergezet ? Weeral blijkt hieruit het pure winstbejag van de grote bedrijven .
    Ziet microsoft dan niet in dat een groot deel van hun klandizie juist uit deze groep mensen komt ??
    Of gaan ze ( verder ) de weg op naar een (luxe) produkt alleen voor de “superrijken” ?
    Shame on you Microsoft …