This is what the warnings sent by six-strikes anti-piracy program actually look like [Image]

cas

A couple of days ago, the “six-strikes” Copyright Alert System was officially launched in the US. But until now, all we’ve known about the system are the details of how it works and the ISPs that will be participating. We haven’t seen what an actual alert looks like.

Ars Technica has solved this problem by reaching out to all the five ISPs that will be participating in the program. But out of the five (AT&T, Verizon, Cablevision, Time Warner Cable, and Comcast), only Comcast responded. They provided Ars with copies of actual alerts, giving us our first glimpse of what they’ll be sending out to infringing accounts.

Interestingly, the alerts are sent to users’ comcast.net email addresses and shown in a pop-up window in their browser. Ars Technica notes that if a user maintained a constant VPN connection and does not check their comcast.net email account, they could actually say that they’ve never received any alerts, or at least not seen them.

Also, you’ll notice that while Comcast did provide copies of the alerts, they only did so for alerts 1, 2, 4 and 5. But if they’re anything like Verizon’s policy, and they most likely are, then it’s most likely due to those alerts containing the same language that you’ll find in the ones provided.

The first alert is what you see above, and here are the rest:

cas2 cas4 cas5

[via Ars Technica]

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5 comments

  1. V

    “Ars Technica notes that if a user maintained a constant VPN connection and does not check their comcast.net email account, they could actually say that they’ve never received any alerts, or at least not seen them.”

    Of course, if one maintained a “constant VPN connection” then Comcast would never know about any of the downloads to begin with (as long as the connection is anonymized, that is).

  2. floydwil

    I believe they should not be in the business of policing the internet by denying paying customers their due service. That is theft. It is the job of law enforcement agencies to govern that. To take a pro-active role in law enforcement is not right and not their job. They already have a monopoly on being a service provider to the world wide web. If a law enforcement agency requests data on specific individuals breaking the law then they should provide that data(only after Law Enforcement gathers enough probable cause that it will stand up in court). Then their job is done at that point. They certainly make enough money without caving in to the content providers witch hunting tactics. I believe that copyright rights should be upheld just not by the service provider. That’s a job for Law enforcement. The real Law breakers will find a way around anything they try to do. So in the end it is pointless to educate.

  3. Bruce

    Any insight into how the copyright owners are obtaining this alleged evidence? Honeypots? Or something even more devious?

    It doesn’t sound from the wording of the notifications that Comcast itself is examining the internals of torrents or other forms of transmission.