How to change default browser in Windows 10 [Tip]

Microsoft recommends using Edge browserMicrosoft’s latest Windows 10 software comes with the new Edge browser, in a desperate attempt to try rebranding the old Internet Explorer browser by getting the negative opinions about the default browser that comes with Windows out of people’s heads. Over the years IE (Internet Explorer) had developed an avoid if you can reputation, with roughly 1 in 10 people choosing IE over Google Chrome. Even the Firefox browser was getting more than 3 times the use of Internet Explorer. Further, more than 1 in 2 visits are coming directly from Safari — a mobile browser — over Internet Explorer. All up, IE is getting around 6% of the web traffic during August of 2015. A figure that’s not close to what Microsoft had hoped for, since the Windows operating system is by far the most popular desktop OS of choice and IE is Microsoft-owned. That’s where Microsoft’s Egde browser come in — a new browser designed to take over from IE and comes with Windows 10.

The Microsoft Edge browser is running on 0.14% of all browsers tracked by Californian-based Net Applications. That number will have grown by now with more people upgrading to Windows 10 during August and part of September. However, data also points to users opting to shy away from the Edge browser in favor of other choices. If you too would like to change from the Edge browser, we’ll show you how after the drop:

HOW TO CHANGE THE DEFAULT BROWSER IN WINDOWS 10

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Navigate to the ‘System’ on the left panel.
  3. Click the ‘Default Apps’ option that’s usually listed toward the bottom of the left panel.
  4. Scroll down to ‘Web Browser’ and set your preference.
  5. After clicking the Web browser option, you’ll get the complete list of browsers currently installed coming to you in app form.

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  • Mathew

    [@Mikerman]

    It could be.

    You would be fighting against some of the largest tech sites in the world with that opinion though:

    Microsoft is killing off Internet Explorer brand
    Microsoft debating rebranding Internet Explorer
    Microsoft considering renaming internet Explorer due to negative perceptions
    Microsoft internally debated rebranding Internet Explorer

    Actual journalist with degrees ‘n’ stuff, unlike little old me.

    You are right though. I never did get access behind closed Microsoft doors, eating pork chop sandwiches will Bill Gates and co.

    I will do my best to impress one of our most loyal readers next week.

  • Mikerman

    Ah, got it. One reason to use a different name may just be because the Edge browser is a different creature from IE. But I don’t have personal knowledge–not on Win10 yet. And as you said, it could be to try to distance from the world of IE.

    It’s funny, but: I’ve been happy with the latest version of IE, on Win8/8.1. I’ve found it more stable than Chrome, and I gave up on Firefox years back when it started having stability and memory leak issues for me.

  • Mathew

    [@Mikerman] Ahh, we are debating the definition of rebrand.

    Got it.

    Yes, Edge is built from new code. I never meant to imply it’s the same browser.

    I used the term rebrand when looking at the reasons for the name change.

  • Mikerman

    [@Mathew] Yep, Mathew, it’s a replacement for Internet Explorer, but it’s not a re-brand of Internet Explorer–it’s a new creature.

  • Mathew

    [@Mikerman] Edge is a direct replacement for Internet Explorer.

  • Mikerman

    No issue with the article as a whole; but the opening comment, “Microsoft’s latest Windows 10 software comes with the new Edge browser, in a desperate attempt to try rebranding the old Internet Explorer browser by getting the negative opinions about a default browser that comes with Windows out of people’s heads.”?

    First, Edge is not Internet Explorer, from everything I’ve read, as a so-called re-brand or otherwise. Second, why consider Edge a “desperate attempt” at anything? Instead, why not consider it a company trying to innovate? And if it works to Microsoft’s advantage, so much the better. In the meanwhile, no need to bash (even if it is Microsoft ;) ), it seems to me. Just one humble reader’s thought.