How to remove built-in apps in Windows 10 [Tip]

As a successor of Windows 8, Windows 10 carries a mission to push Universal App Platform (UAP) and Windows Store. Microsoft wants to not only get a lot of apps on the Store but also to get users familiar with the new app model on traditional desktop environment. That’s why almost all basic programs of Windows now are Store apps, such as Photos, Music, and Calculator. Besides those built-in necessaries, there are some showcase apps like Candy Crush Saga that shipped with Windows 10. For many users, this is annoying and they just want to remove those out of the system. But it’s not that easy since they’re built-in apps that come with the OS, you can’t just right click and select Uninstall. Today, I’ll show you how to remove them using PowerShell.

By using PowerShell, you can remove any Store app you like, even if it’s a built-in app like Maps or Music.

  • First you need to open PowerShell with Administrator right. Do this by typing “PowerShell” into the search bar on Taskbar, right click the result PowerShell and select “Run as Administrator”
  • In PowerShell, run the command below. This command searches for the app package whose name contains the word you specify in app_name (e.g. run Get-AppxPackage *maps* to find the package(s) for any app that has the word “maps” in its name). You want to do this to get the full package name so you won’t accidentally delete other apps when there is more than one app that has the name you’re looking for.

Get-AppxPackage *app_name*

  • Once you run the command, what you need to look for is “PackageFullName” line. You want to copy it by click the beginning of the name and drag your mouse to the end to highlight it then right click. You won’t see any response from the screen but don’t worry, the line is copied when you right click. The line you copied will look similar to this: “Microsoft.WindowsMaps_4.1601.10150.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe”
remove_builtin_1
  • Then, still in PowerShell window, type (don’t run yet) the command (remember to have a space after it):

Remove-AppxPackage

Then place your mouse after the line, right click to paste the package full name you copied earlier. Now hit enter and voila, it’s removed! The complete command should look like this (I want to remove Windows Maps app in this example):

Remove-AppxPackage Microsoft.WindowsMaps_4.1601.10150.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe

remove_builtin_2

And that’s all!

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  • 123dave

    Thanks!

  • robcr

    I was going to ask you in what way an app differs from an installed program, or from a program that requires no installation,
    You say that they are part of the OS
    It has annoyed me for decades that MS do not use ‘KISS’, instead some of their stuff has been like a goa’uld.
    And now it appears they are doing it again

    Mumble, mumble,
    Rob