Steve Jobs biopic premieres at Sundance, Apple co-founder Wozniak says script is crap

jobsbiopic

The Steve Jobs biopic, titled Jobs and featuring Ashton Kutcher as the late former Apple CEO, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. This is in advance of its nationwide screening, which is set for April 19th. Reviews from various sites have been published, and it’s looking like reactions are pretty mixed.

The Next Web and The Verge thought the film was pretty decent, but not much more than that. The film was supposedly playing it safe, and its budgetary constraints were apparently noticeable. CNET lies on the other spectrum, calling the film shallow and saccharine. Speaking of not being much of a fan of the movie, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak was actually offered to contribute to the film, but turned it down after reading the script. “I was approached early on. I read a script as far as I could stomach it and felt it was crap.”

What’s interesting is that Wozniak’s hate on the film seems to be limited to the script. “I still told everyone that I thought the Jobs movie would be a big hit and I looked forward to it. I felt they did a very good job of casting, looking for good actors who could play the roles,” Wozniak said.

Sony Pictures, which is producing another Steve Jobs film that is being penned by Aaron Sorkin, who recently (successfully) made a film on Facebook with The Social Network, also contacted Steve Wozniak — and he chose to go with them instead. Whether that’s a sign of which movie will ultimately turn out better, we won’t really know until both movies are out for everyone to see. Jobs is again set for April 19, while the Sorkin-led film is due sometime this year. In the meantime, check out a short clip from Jobs below! Spoiler alert: Ashton still looks and sounds like Ashton to me.

[via MacRumors, The Verge]

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4 comments

  1. AT

    @Enrique: @David Roper:

    I’m not saying this movie is good or bad. I’m not saying this movie is entertaining or not. That wasn’t my point. Asking Hollywood to portray history these past 20+ years and you can expect a twisted account.

    Case in point. The movie U-571 had American forces board the sub, but in reality, it was the British who boarded the sub and they weren’t targeted by friendly forces. Adding a tiny disclaimer at the end of the movie, when everyone who can’t sit still is now leaving, does not change the impression on the audience. The audience will still believe the movie.

    If you follow foreign films you may have noticed there were many Chinese movies based on historical events and classic Chinese novels in the past few years. They followed the Hollywood model and took liberties. I believe the Chinese government has now passed a law that forbids people from making historical dramas that does NOT follow history. Movies and TV shows about classic novels MUST follow those works. The film makers can make movies that don’t follow history, but are forbidden from calling it historical. These movies are just costumed dramas.

    People do learn history from movies. People do learn literary classics from movies. By not presenting an accurate portrayal diminishes both the historical event and us all culturally.

  2. David Roper

    @AT:
    Since the public is stupid, not us at Dot tech, but the man on the street – see Jay Leno’s man on the street and you will see the biggest idiots in the world- but I digress. Hollywood is fine for these morons who cannot read and if you pick the right movie you can enjoy it. Jobs’ story may be fun to watch… just saying.

  3. Enrique

    @AT: I think you need to give them a little more credit than that. Try seeing The Social Network. It’s probably not 100 percent accurate, and a lot of it is dramatized for the big screen but it did what it set out to do quite well. Present the story of the founding of Facebook in a thoughtful and entertaining way.

    If Aaron Sorkin is making a movie about Steve Jobs, I can pretty much guarantee right now that it will be anything but crap. The books are great too, and the Walter Isaacson book is what the Sony Jobs biopic will be based on. But remember, these are different mediums. They each have their advantages and disadvantages. And as always, to each their own.

  4. AT

    If you want to learn something about Steve Jobbs, read a book. Hollywood can’t even get current events right. How are they expected to get this right? Just because the writers use an iMac does not make them authorities on computers let alone Jobbs.