Canon has an insane 75-megapixel DSLR in the works [Rumor]

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Canon’s current high-end DSLRs top out at around the 20-megapixel range. While megapixel count certainly isn’t everything, and Canon’s pro cameras certainly make the case for it by churning out great photos, you have to admit that it’s a little weird that there’s a smartphone that packs twice as many megapixels as the industry favorite 5D Mark III.

If a report from the Photography Bay is to be believed, Canon’s pro DLSRs should be getting a large boost on that front in the future. Citing a reliable source, the report claims that Canon is testing a new camera that has a sensor with over 75-megapixels. 75. Megapixels.

The camera is also described to have a “a pro-sized body like the 1D X,” a higher frame rate capability than the 1D X (14fps in Super High Speed Mode) and a rear screen that is “shockingly high resolution.”

But to make things even more interesting, their source claims that the camera could be announced as soon as this year and hit the market sometime in 2014. Sounds a little aggressive, if not a little ambitious depending on what kind of testing stages they’re currently in.

If this turns out to be the real deal, it might just be what Canon needs to separate their cameras from all the high-end smartphone cameras that will continue to pop up now and well into next year.

[via Photography Bay, Gizmodo, image via Andrew Smith]  

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2 comments

  1. Enrique Manalang
    Author/Staff

    [@Louis] Yeah, Nokia’s trying to solve that by way of “digital zoom” in their 1020.

    http://dottech.org/116065/nokia-lumia-1020-is-official-can-its-41mp-camera-bring-nokia-back-from-the-dead/

    It’s not even really zoom, it just takes extremely large pictures so zooming in doesn’t doesn’t degrade quality too much. But judging from numerous impressions online, it works well.

    I agree with you, especially since using the device that’s always with you will always be more convenient. But I think hardcore photography fans will probably disagree, since they’re very aware of the minute differences in quality :)

  2. Louis

    Professionals and photography enthusiasts aside, for the rest of us, the dividing line between using your cellphone and taking your (extra piece of equipment little digital camera / vidcam combo — like my Sanyo) along with you on that sightseeing trip, is becoming more prominent.

    With the advantages of both high res and especially (!!!) zero time lag + multiple pics at the same time (worst to be deleted later) that one gets from any of the top smartphones, one sees more and more people just using their smartphones to take pictures (even lacking an optical zoom) — with a few diehard enthusiasts lugging around gigantic DSLRs

    Not knocking these, they are impressive, but unless it’s long-distance photo’s you need, I’ve collected pictures that were taken by people on a tour, to add to my own, noting their cameras (usually found in the ID tags anyway), and to be quite honest, I’ve seen similar scene pictures taken by numerous small digital camera and smartphones that equal or exceed the quality of those from the DSLR’s in general.

    I’ve just now got the Samsung Galaxy phone here in China, and the speed and convenience is already making my nice little 14 MP / 12 x optical zoom almost obsolete (because it unfortunately, in my case, have a considerable (and now very irritating) time lag.from focusing, to actually taking the pic).

    It will sure be interesting to see what the future will bring for digital photography. I have to believe that the lack of an optical zoom will always be in the game as a factor against using a high end cellphone when needing outdoors pictures on organised events at least, depending on the new add-on optical lens that is apparently being tested for cellphones (I being somewhat sceptical of it)