RapidShare unveils RapidDrive, a cloud storage service expected to rival Dropbox, Skydrive, Google Drive, etc.

Hoping to make a stand in the cloud storage arena, RapidShare has stepped in with RapidDrive, a cloud storage service that will act as an active competitor for established services such as Dropbox, Skydrive, Google Drive, etc.

Technically speaking RapidDrive isn’t a cloud storage service in of itself. The cloud storage service portion of RapidDrive is actually RapidShare, the website that allows users to share and store files. RapidDrive is a desktop program that links RapidDrive accounts to your desktop. Think Dropbox and Dropbox desktop client; RapidShare is Dropbox while RapidDrive is Dropbox desktop client.

RapidDrive, which is currently compatible with Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7, integrates into the Windows operating systems making your RapidShare account act just like a regular hard drive. RapidDrive integrates to the user’s PC and acts just like a local drive to which new files can be added just by the drag-and-drop method and existing files can be modified similarly. The synchronization of RapidShare files through RapidDrive is very simple, requiring the user to just login to his/her account to make the “local drive” accessible “globally”.

Although RapidDrive may sound like it is only now catching up to the competition, what might potentially make RapidDrive stand out above the crowd is the fact that users get unlimited storage and traffic. You see RapidDrive is available only to RapidPro customers. All RapidPro customers get unlimited storage space and unlimited traffic (plus other features such as direct downloads, SSL, etc.) As such, anyone using RapidDrive will have the advantages provided by their RapidPro account — unlimited storage and traffic. At 4.11-9.90 euros a month (depending on what RapidPro plan you purchase), that is a killer deal that no other cloud storage service can match.

Alexandra Zwingli, CEO of RapidShare, says “With RapidDrive, we are providing a tool that creates an even closer link between cloud storage and the PC environment, which makes it easier to manage files. RapidDrive is an essential means of simplifying work processes, especially for customers who are regular users of RapidShare at work.”

Currently RapidDrive is in Beta and the final release of RapidDrive is expected to come around the coming September, after the application and the service get stabilized. Currently RapidDrive is freely available to RapidPro customers but it is unclear if RapidDrive will continue to be free for RapidPro customers after public release, and if RapidDrive will ever come to users of RapidShare’s free service. However, RapidDrive is expected to be made compatible with other operating systems in the future. If you would like to try out RapidDrive on your Windows OS right now, then click on the link below:

RapidDrive homepage

[via BGR]

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18 comments

  1. cpusrvc

    @sl0j0n: (Grammer lovers:) depends on your backup needs. (No capitalization, incomplete sentence, maybe incomplete thought) I only backup data files. I cannot imagine backing up an entire computer and it’s OS. To download the entire backup successfully could take many hours, not to mention retries when downloads are interrupted or corrupted.

    I personally use 2 free cloud services for data file backup, 4Sync (15gb) and Dropbox (5gb?, not using their image space offer yet). I have my Dropbox folder for my most important files INSIDE of my 4Sync folder where I keep other files. This way 4Sync has all my files including those in Dropbox, and Dropbox has the important files. That’s DUAL backup for important files (in case once service goes bankrupt, etc.). The beauty is that they are both syncing / backing up my files continuously within seconds of creation / modification. I like to think of it as totally maintenance-free backup, that’s also retrievable from any computer.

  2. sl0j0n

    Holey knickers, Batman, its a bunch of English majors!
    Really tho, *I* learned something, and a big Thank you to “Chris”, for his link to the Writer’s Handbook.
    I’ve been needing one of those.
    Now, IF I could just find a *free* cloud storage service for an offsite backup solution.
    BTW, was that one comma too many?

    Have a GREAT day, neighbors!

  3. Mark

    @ Proofreader! and Chris: Thanks for taking a stand on behalf of grammar!

    @Ashraf: Thanks for taking them seriously, and more thanks for running a blog that’s among my most trusted computing blogs (I have been coming here for years, though I hardly ever comment). And while I’m gabbing away anyway, allow me to say that Godwin’s contributions are often not quite up to the quality I’ve come to expect here. For me, they dilute the blog rather than add interest to it. Just my 2¢ worth.

    @jayesstee: It’s not a “free service”, as the article correctly states, just a free add-on to a paid service.

    As a Rapidshare customer of many years (most of them with a paid account) I would warn against paying for an account with them based on this feature *alone*. RS have a long history of sudden reversals of their rules, and what you are able to do today with your paid account you may not be able to do from next month for the rest of your pre-paid subscription, even though it was part of the deal when you entered into it.

  4. jayesstee

    @Ashraf et al:

    I’m fussy about the English I use, but in a welcome report on a free service, does it matter? If you can understand it, then it’s good enough!

    Like Ashraf said write to him off-topic.

    Thank you and keep up the good work to Godwin and all the other contributors!

  5. Chris

    @Ashraf: It isn’t about winning and loosing; it is about learning. I learn from reading your articles and I’m glad that there was an opportunity for your knowledge of grammar to grow.

  6. mukhi

    my suggestions:
    Technically speaking, [comma needed] RapidDrive isn’t a cloud storage service itself [not "in of itself"].
    The synchronization of RapidShare files through RapidDrive is [required] very simple, [comma not needed, IMO] requiring the user to just login to his/her account to make the “local drive” accessible “globally”.
    Currently, [comma needed] RapidDrive is freely available to RapidPro customers but it is unclear if RapidDrive will continue to be free for RapidPro customers after public release, [comma, not semicolon] and if RapidDrive will ever come to users of RapidShare’s free service.

    well, enough of grammar. i think the writer may be excused given that he writes several articles, and that he does not write for mr. president.

    but Ashraf, rapiddrive is, although unlimited, not free for free users! therefore, i would not consider it as an equivalent to other services mentioned. ^_^

  7. Chris

    @Ashraf: Maybe this will help:
    http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon
    (Don’t use it with conjunctions.)
    http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/how-to-use-semicolons.aspx
    (You should never use a semicolon and a coordinating conjunction such as “and,” “so,” and “but” to join two main clauses; that’s the job of a comma.)
    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/607/04/
    (Use a comma after the first independent clause when you link two independent clauses with one of the following coordinating conjunctions: and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet.
    Use a semicolon when you link two independent clauses with no connecting words.)
    http://www.essortment.com/use-semicolon-properly-33063.html
    (Independent clauses are series of words that could stand alone as complete sentences. When you have two otherwise complete sentences that you want to connect to form one long sentence, use a semicolon between them.

    Example: This could be a complete sentence; this could be another one.
    There is, however, one exception that can cause you a problem. You don’t use a semicolon to connect two complete sentences if there’s a conjunction between the clauses (and, but, etc.). In that case, use a comma.

    Example: This could be a complete sentence, and this could be another one.)

  8. Ashraf
    Mr. Boss

    @Chris: Joining two independent clauses is only one of the situations in which to use a semicolon, from what I understand. Another situation is what I mentioned in my previous comment.

    In any case, I’m not an English expert so I may be wrong.

  9. Chris

    @Ashraf, I see what you are saying, but that website mentions that a ‘;’ joins two ‘independent clauses’, which according to their definition (http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/indclause.html) means the clauses could stand alone; that is to say, they are complete, independent sentences. Therefore, “and if RapidDrive will ever come to users of RapidShare’s free service” is not suitable to be used by itself before or after a ‘;’ because it isn’t a clause that can stand alone as a proper sentence.

  10. Chris

    “and if RapidDrive will ever come to users of RapidShare’s free service” is not a complete sentence, so it can’t be combined with a ‘;’. Only complete sentences can be combined together with a ‘;’; a ‘;’ acts very similarly to a ‘.’.

    At least that is the error I see.

  11. Ashraf
    Mr. Boss

    @Proofreader!: Id appreciate if all complaints are made to me and not directed at my writers regarding this matter. I review articles before publishing and I’m responsible for all grammatical errors, especially because many of the typos are due to quick edits I make.

    Secondly, Im not sure what errors you are pointing out. From what you quote, the only error I see is an omission of ‘is’ in ‘…through RapidDrive very simple’. However, your English may be stronger than mine so please do tell so I can fix.

    Thanks!

  12. Proofreader!

    >> in of itself
    >> The synchronization of RapidShare files through RapidDrive very simple
    >> ; and if RapidDrive will ever come to users of RapidShare’s free service.
    >> You see RapidDrive is available only to RapidPro customers.

    I realize not everyone is a native English speaker, and not everyone is familiar with rules of English grammar. But please, can’t these articles get at least a little editing/proofreading before being posted?
    (BTW – I have no problems with Ashraf’s and Locutus’s articles.)